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Cornered bully lashes out
The old guard of the Tory Party are up against the wall and instead of giving in gracefully to public pressure, they are resorting to the kind of rhetoric last seen in the old Colonial days when the spears were flying thick and fast.
First we had the Junior Doctors dispute where they thought that scientists and medics would be unable to see through the false calculation of increased mortality at weekends. Some of them (including Junior Ministers) have now admitted these calculations were not accurate, but still they insist that the argument is purely a matter of pay, when the Doctors are actually fighting to save the NHS. Even at the last minute the Government are trying to put conditions on the talks. It is obvious from public reaction that they have lost the argument.

Next we have the edict that all schools will become Academies. This has come off the rails when the Minister concedes that schools with good or outstanding reports would not benefit from change. The reaction to the initial scheme to privatise education was so strongly resisted by parents and teachers that a climb down was inevitable. However, the parting shot from the Minister was that they will all become Academies in the end because Local Authorities will not be able to provide sufficient finance to maintain schools. Of course not, because it is the policy of the Tories to cut funding to Local Authorities so that the only way out is to out-source all of the services to their chums in big business.

Then we have the failure to meet the promise to fund the Cornish Language.
This was part of the deal when the Cornish were recognised as a national minority through the Council of Europe’s Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities. This was followed by support from the UK Government through the Charter for Regional and Minority Languages, and the Department of Communities and Local Government had been providing a modest amount of funding for the language. They promised that this would continue for a further number of years, and they have now gone back on this promise, apparently due to economics. I have yet to see an assessment of how much money is spent per year teaching English in Cornish Schools, which after all is a foreign language, now we are recognised as a Nation.
I have also seen figures that show that tourists think that having a separate language is a very attractive feature of Cornwall, and brings in millions for the tourist industry.

And now, what happened to Localism? St. Ives Council have bravely grasped the nettle and said enough is enough. No more second homes until there are enough affordable homes for local people especially youngsters. They have done this by a strictly legal process via a neighbourhood plan and a referendum and gained overwhelming support. Many other Cornish Town and Parish Council now want to join in. However, a developer, (and I bet a Tory supporter with not much local connection), is launching a judicial Review in the High Court to get this overturned. The Government seem to think this won’t succeed so they are rushing a Bill through Parliament to make it law that the people cannot decide how their communities will develop. I can’t see the 83% of people in St. Ives who voted for this laying down and being walked on.

The bullies in Westminster have been given a bloody nose, but are still threatening to “tell their Dad on you”. It is now time for MK to step in and show the public that we are a real alternative, and that the only way forward is a Cornish Assembly.
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By Rod Toms. Published on 9th May 2016.

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